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HOTEL CIS PARIS KELLERMANN 13ème

Welcome to the Hotel CIS Paris Kellermann
  • 6 conference rooms
  • 175 rooms
  • 2 restaurants
  • Free WIFI available
  • 1 free parking

 

Located in the 13th district of Paris, on the edge of a natural parc of 6-hectare park with an equipped fitness trail, the Hotel CIS Paris Kellermann welcomes you in a green and leafy setting.


Its 175 rooms, sober and luminous, will answer all your requests with rooms hosting from 1 to 8
persons. Free WIFI is available.


For the organization of your meetings and seminars, 6 conference rooms fully equipped welcoming up to 80 people are at your disposal.


Before leaving for a day of sightseeing, you can enjoy a continental breakfast at the buffet, or enjoy a healthy and balanced lunch and dinner in our restaurant.


The Hotel CIS Paris Kellermann offers you a free secure parking for personal car and buses (place according to availability).

 

The must-see places around the Hotel CIS Paris Kellermann

 

CONTACTS

 

CENTRALE DE RÉSERVATION 

Tél. : +33 (0)1 43 58 96 00 

E-mail: reservation@cisp.fr 

 

HOTEL CIS PARIS KELLERMANN

17, boulevard Kellermann 75013 Paris

Tél. : +33 (0)1 44 16 37 38 


 

ACCESS


Public transportation :

From Paris :

Subway line 7, station « Porte d’Italie »

Bus #184, « Damesne » stop,

Tramway T3a, « Porte d’Italie » stop

 

From Charles de Gaulle airport :

bus #351, RER B

 

From Orly airport : Orly bus

By car :

From « Boulevard périphérique » exit « Porte d’Italie »


  • Opening hours

  • Spoken languages
  • FrançaisAnglais

  • Payment methods
  • elem-cashVisaMaster CardCarte bleueChèque-vacances
Phone: +33 1 43 58 96 00

Address:
17 Boulevard Kellermann
75013 PARIS
FRANCE
Access:
Public transportation:
From Paris :
Subway line 7, station « Porte d’Italie »
Bus #184, « Damesne » stop,
Tramway T3a, « Porte d’Italie » stop

From Charles de Gaulle airport :
bus #351, RER B

From Orly airport : Orly bus
By car :
From « Boulevard périphérique » exit « Porte d’Italie »